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20121001
20121009
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bought some stocks in are the energy area and the industrials area recently. >> were you going to just jump in? sorry about that. >> yeah, i was going to ask -- peter was talking about looking for a pullback. i think a lot of people are looking for the pullback. that's the tough part. if everyone is looking for the pullback, it may not come or when we want it. it could be put off for quite a ways. >> that's a good point. what about that? you don't want to fight the fed, right? >> yeah, i guess not, but i think the market is kind of at least at a stalemate with the fed here. if you look back to when qe 3 was announced, we're just about even, maybe a little bit higher. i think that, to me, is a big warning sign that, you know, how long is it going to be? what point does the market become qe resistant? we're testing that thesis right now. i'm looking at some of the other factors. i'm looking at insider selling right now which is about 11 times higher than insider buying during september. so somebody out there is getting scared. i think that's a lot of the reasons we talk about often. fina
and energy a little later on. >>> first, as you probably know, a grim outlook for hp sent shares down 13% yesterday. ceo meg whitman expects revenues and profits for the tech giant to decline in the near term saying unprecedented executive turnovers led to inconsistent strategic choices. our david faber is with meg whitman. david, good morning to you. >> reporter: thanks very much, carl. of course, well, you can certainly give them credit perhaps for transparency, hewle hewle hewlett-packard yesterday laying out a plan tofor remaking the company for next year they're calling a fix and rebuild year. as you said, the stock took a hit on that news. we are joined by the ceo of hewlett-packard, meg whitman joins us from headquarters in palo alto. as always, very much appreciate your willingness to come on in what are seemingly very difficult times. you and i sat down a little more than a year ago when you first joined the company. and i guess my first question would simply be what took you so long? a year is quite a while in the history of a company, certainly one that seems to be in some dis
90 points, two-thirds of 1%. when you look at today's sector leaders, it's energy, financials, health care. all posting sharp gains at this hour. of course, the energy and materials sector were really the pressured sectors going quarter. bill? >> combination of risk on/risk off seconders that are doing well today. no clear direction from that standpoint. we're wondering whether today's market action is a sign of what's to come for the quarter. you saw the statistic earlier that said on average when you have a positive first day of the fourth quarter the dow is up 4% for the quarter. so what's to come this quarter? deborah of "the street" says she feels the market is destined to go higher and points out $22 billion came flooding out of equity mutual funds in the month of august, alone. show she feels that money is going to come flowing back for the investors who feel they missed out on the action, marie w ya. >> is deborah right? could we have this market meltup continue? cnbc contributor abigail doolittle suggests taking money off the table in the face of these gains. deborah, let me
, government decides, you know, the future is green energy and throw a lot of money at any small company that gets in the green energy field that creates a lot of problems. load up on debt. they don't -- they lack market discipline. they expand capacity beyond demand and what you end up with is sol lynn draft. >> so, what could government do effectively to help not the small young companies, necessarily but the smaller, fast-growing companies? what in your article you call the gazelles? >> the gazelles. one thing could you do is think about what growth companies do, they are always expanding, outgrow their office, their factory, what happens when they do that they run into a lot of luke roarcracy, building permits, environmental impact statements. what government can do is clear out the bureaucracy, take a concierge approach. >> let us help you that helps you be local then rather than state or federal right? >> that's right. most of the on obstacles are local. >> feed the gazelles but not with cheap capital government subsidies that causes those growth companies to take their eye off the
stronger against euro. when that happens usually materials and energies are weaker. that's what's happening today. there's been some collateral damage with other stocks that are suppliers to hp. advanced micromoved down on that news. that's a new three-year low for advanced micro. >> i'm looking for the silver lining. >> we've been moving up for several days in a row right now and are approaching the highs we had a week and a half ago. >> we'll be following jon fortt and bob pisani. ty, back to you. >>> let's drill down on some of the economic issues that are going to come up in tonight's presidential debate. a positive read on jobs ahead of friday's employment report. on the other hand, a bit of a red flag being raised in housing. steve leisman and diana olick are all over the data points. steve, the latest jobs data, is it changing in any way the expectations for this friday's employment report? >> not a lot. economists would like to go from the adp data to higher estimates but it's not been that great over the past couple months. there's a lot of of caution out there among wall street ec
. >> thank you so much, rick. let's check out the latest moves in energy and metals. sharon at the nymex. >> the momentum here definitely in the metals market. i'm standing in the gold pit. gold prices went above $1,794 an ounce. a lot of investors may have looked at the s&p 500's returns, that's decent. but gold up over 10% in the last quarter. silver up over 25% in the last quarter. they want some more of that in the fourth quarter. and we're looking at that here in the metals market. also looking at momentum taking over, the weak sentimental data out of china in terms of the oil price. the oil prices here are a little bit of a bid for oil. the fact that they lowered a mix a little while ago before the open on the weak data out of china on their manufacturing numbers. in terms of the biggest mover here in the commodities space, definitely it is natural gas. natural gas at a ten-month high. natural gas here above 3.40. some are saying that $3 gas is sustainable here even if we don't see the same focus on coal to gas switching. still going to see higher natural gas prices. back to you. >
governor romney talked about creating 4 million jobs by embracing an energy independence for north america. i have the ceo of the largest pipeline builder on my other show "mad money" last night. he said 4 million is reasonable, but the federal government is not being helpful. i know you favor all sort of energy, solar, fantastic. what do you say about the 4 million? >> actually, a say that we need to create more jobs across the board and particularly, highly skilled people to work in the refinery and production areas where we're finding more energy and we have to have a balance, so i'm totally for that. i encourage more a perennisship programs and training in that area. we have a high need for welders and people working in refineries and i'm all for paying for those jobs and looking at other alternative forms of energy and we have to have a balance of both. >> the unemployment rate falling below 8% for the first time since january 2009 and i'm sure the labor department was hearing about that this morning. at the same time, can you tell the american people that this 7.8 number marks the tu
of texas in the energy business, that investors are very focused on, it's a three-member utility commission that is going to make that decision. they are appointed by the governor. big debate between the president and his republican challenger, mitt romney. it wasn't that long ago that rick perry was one of the challengers for the republican nomination for president. i asked him what he thinks romney is going to do tonight and how he is going to do in tonight's debate. >> this president has to defend the debt that's being created and i think governor romney's going to do a very good job of one of growth, of one of allowing the states to be more engaged in policies. >> reporter: so, of course, he thinks romney is going to do good tonight. is he partisan, no doubt about that. we'll see how it plays out. >> david, i understand that you're still going to talk to kyle bass in a few minutes. what is top of questions in your mind? >> kyle is a big macro thinker. he also runs a hedge fund that makes stock picks like everybody else. we're also going to talk about, first off, the growing debt world w
, pretty nice rally here. energy materials, industrials, even consumer staples participating in this rally. we're expecting very significant increase in earnings about 20% over last year. >> that's almost a 4% gain in goldman sachs. >> look at the overall group moving to the up side. we need some positive earnings commentary from this group for the fourth quarter for the s&p to make numbers. finally, airlines are up as the international air transport association talked about a higher profit outlook for the airlines this year. given the prices i've been paying for travel? there ought to be -- >> you're our leading indicator. >> it hurts! >> absolutely. thank you. see you a little bit later. >>> art cashin is also with us on the floor. director of floor operations with ubs financial services. bob mentioned europe a little bit. but put that aside, as we begin a new quarter, last quarter we were up 4% and the market just doesn't seem to want to give anything back. what do you make of it? >> no. it's behaving very, very well here. although i will say i'm a little disappointed the techs have giv
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9